Posted in Breakfast, Recipes, Snacks, Traditional Gujarati Recipes

Surti Khaman / Vati Daal na Khaman!

I am pretty sure Dhoklas need no introduction. There are numerous versions of Dhoklas. Khatta Dhokla ( made of rice and Urad Daal ) is easily distinguishable from the Khaman because of the colour and composition. While the Instant Nylon Khaman ( made with Besan/Chickpea flour and eno/cooking soda ) is immensely popular among folks, popular even among folks even outside Gujarat, we South Gujaratis ( especially folks from in and around Surat ), favour the overnight fermented version much more over the instant ones. Vaati Daal Na Khaman is distinct from the Nylon Khaman in the sense that they are made of Chana Daal, that has been soaked, ground and fermented overnight and does not have any soda or citric acid in the batter, at least my version doesn’t. It is dense and crumbly at the same time unlike the soda-induced sponginess of Nylon Khaman. The ground batter is then spiced with ginger chilli paste, turmeric powder, lemon juice and salt. Instant / Nylon Khaman has a slight aftertaste of cooking/baking soda which puts me off personally.

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Posted in Indian Curries, Recipes

Kadhai Paneer, or let us just say, my take on Jigg Kalra’s Kadhai Paneer!

Growing up, Paneer Butter Masala was my favourite thing to order in restaurants. The oily, creamer texture was something never made in homes for obvious reasons, so naturally, that is what I wanted to eat then. Fast forward to the present and I like spicier curries, not necessarily heavy on garam masala, but with more flavours than just cream, tomato and sugar. But Indian restaurants are a funny phenomenon if you ask me: every restaurant will serve a Kadhai Paneer or a Paneer Butter Masala, that is different from the next one in colour or in texture or in taste, or if your luck is particularly worse on that day, all of the above. So, now my bench mark for North Indian gravies is set on on a particularly nondescript place in Hyderabad, rather than what the high-end restaurants serve. For the brief spell of eight months that I stayed in Hyderabad as a newly wed, I had a chance to eat a tiny, 2 room eatery called Delhi 39. It had exactly 4 tables and 16 chairs and nothing else, so I guess I don’t have to explain the ambience. But

For the brief spell of eight months that I stayed in Hyderabad as a newly wed, I had a chance to eat a tiny, 2 room eatery called Delhi 39. It had exactly 4 tables and 16 chairs and nothing else, so I guess I don’t have to explain the ambience. But food was amazing, the fulkas ( sorry, no tandoori bread here ) as soft and round and puffy as home made, the curries tasted like they were from a North Indian friends Lunch box ( Rajma was sublime and paneer curries are the best I have tasted!! ) and the paranthas, simply the best paranthas ever. The curries were priced between 45-65 rupees, ( not kidding!! ) and well, that is what I want now whenever I feel like eating north Indian fare. Sadly we moved to Bangalore then, and even the famed Manjit da Dhaba hasn’t been able to match that.

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Posted in Breakfast, Healthy Snacking, Recipes

Doodhi na Muthiya – Steamed Dumplings made from Bottlegourd and Multigrain Flour!

Muthiyas are a Gujarati snack made from fresh seasonal vegetables and a mix of several flours, that is made into a dough, shaped into logs, steamed and then deep fried or tempered in some oil to give it a crisp texture on the outside and a soft, melt in the mouth center. Mutthi ( મુઠ્ઠી ) translated from Gujarati means a fist, and hence the nomenclature since traditionally, Muthiyas are shaped by shaping the dough into fistfuls. It is not compulsory though, I usually divide the dough into 3-4 portions, each much larger than a fist before steaming them. Once they cool down, I cut them into bite sized chunks and shallow fry them to give them a crisp crust.

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Posted in Desserts, Recipes, Traditional Gujarati Recipes

Shrikhand – the Indian counterpart of flavoured yoghurt !

Shrikhand is a dessert made from strained curd/yoghurt which is sweetened with powdered sugar, some cardamom and saffron along with other flavourings of choice. It is a pretty easy dessert to make, and the only tough part is to strain the curd removing all the whey to get thick, almost solid hung curd which is called Chakka.  I usually set full cream milk to make curd at home, but if not you can use store bought thick curd to make the same.

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Posted in Desserts, Recipes

Moong Daal Halwa and the memories of those chilly, winter weddings!

If you have ever been a part of a wedding in North India, I am pretty sure you know, and you love Moong Daal Halwa. It is a popular Rajasthani dessert/sweetmeat made by roasting soaked and ground moong ( split and skinless green gram ) in ghee until golden and sweetening it with sugar, cooking it until it is of a thick, luscious consistency. Naturally, its high calorific value makes it a little too heavy to be consumed in warm weather, but it is the perfect treat for cold, windy nights when all you crave is something that warms you up right from the inside.

 

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Posted in Breakfast, Recipes

Whole Moong and Brown Rice Idlis

Of late, I haven’t been able to make freshly cooked Indian breakfasts like I used to do until a couple of months ago. When I did this 100HappyBreakfasts Project on Instagram, I was reasonably regularly if not fully. But I have fallen off the wagon recently.  So in a desperate attempt to get back to the routine, I have started with these Whole Moong and Brown Rice Idlis.

Moong Idlis have been on my mind for a while now, but most recipes available on the internet use Eno / fruit salt to make them light and fluffy. While I don’t mind using eno/soda occasionally in my Rava Idlis and Rava Dhoklas, I most definitely wanted to avoid it here, we prefer the fermented idlis and dosas any day over the instant ones. Feel free to add more rice than what I have used here, I was experimenting a bit, trying to see if I can make do with less rice. Idli Rice and regular polished rice will work just as well. My next attempt would be to try and see if it ferments just as well without Urad Daal next time. 😊  More on how I prepare my regular Idli/Dosa Batter is described in detail here.

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Posted in Dips, Raitas and Sides, Recipes, Traditional Gujarati Recipes

Gujarati Keri Kanda ni Chutney!

Mangoes and summers go pretty much hand in hand, right? Summers mean vacations, trips to grandparents’, pickles, aamras and pretty much everything that makes one happy. And that has to include food to make it complete. We all know from the bottom of our hearts that our moms and grandmoms create magic in their kitchens, but I am equally amazed at the sheer variety of curries and condiments they serve on a platter. I believe that while curries and mains make up a meal, the condiments, pickles and the sides make it satisfying. They also make meal times exciting, I have always had a particular pickle/preserve/chutney that I would look forward to on my plate depending on the season. Now, that we have started to chat about condiments and summer, mangoes cannot be far away.

I am sure there must be a variant of the quintessential mango chutney in every state with a tweak of an ingredient here and there. We Gujaratis make it because consuming it protects one against the harsh warm winds that are common in the sweltering heat of a Gujarati summer. Or so my Baa ( my paternal grandma) says. She makes it every couple of days, more like, as soon as the previous batch is consumed, and take my word for it, it’s not more than a couple of days. I also like this version for its simplicity. A couple of commonplace ingredients and no cooking involved. My mom makes it with the first Totapuri mangoes of the season, which are vibrant parrot green in colour ( I think, the mix of tartness and sweetness of this variety of mangoes suits this chutney the most, but feel free to use any variety you might find locally ). Mangoes, onions and a few day-to-day ingredients, a little bit of grating, sprinkling and mixing, and viola! The chutney is here.

One of the Gujarati summer staples – Keri Kanda ni Chutney ( Raw Mango and Onion Chutney or Relish or Salsa whatever ) ! Now, since summers and mangoes have a close association, I am sure there must be a variant of this condiment in every state with a tweak of an ingredient here and there. We Gujaratis make it because consuming it protects one against the harsh warm winds that are common in the sweltering heat of a Gujarati summer. Or so my Baa ( my paternal grandma) says. She makes it every couple of days, more like, as soon as the previous batch is consumed, and take my word for it, it's not more than a couple of days. I haven't got my bearings back, I have a mountain of laundry to do, and I am still a zombie but I had to make this amazing yet easy peasy chutney this morning, because the visit home and a taste of the harsh summer made me crave this chutney so so much! 😍 I also like this for it's simplicity. A couple of common place ingredients and no cooking involved. My mom makes it with the first Totapuri mangoes of the season, which are vibrant parrot green in colour ( I think, the mix of tartness and sweetness of this variety of mangoes suits this chutney the most ), and peels and grates them. For one Totapuri Mango, she grates a large onion, and mixed them. Then, in goes jaggery ( sugar doesn't bring the same flavour but will work okay if you are in a hurry ), 1/2 tsp of black salt aka સંચળ in Gujarati, 1/2 tsp of cumin powder and 1/2 tsp chilli powder ( I prefer Kashmiri, because I look for colour and not the heat ). Add enough jaggery to balance the tartness of mangoes. Mix well and let it stand for a few minutes allowing the juices to secrete and the flavours to combine. Use as desired. But I would highly recommend not making it in big batches ( I stick to 1 Mango + 1 onion quantity) because one it has a short shelf life and two, if it gets too runny sitting for a long time, it doesn't taste the same. #kerikandanichutney #rawmangochutney #indianchutneys #indiansummer #picklenation #rawmango

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