Posted in Historical Fiction, My Bibliothèque, Mythology, Women's Fiction

{ Book Review } – Karna’s Wife: The Outcast’s Queen by Kavita Kane!

Karna’s Wife: The Outcast’s Queen by Kavita Kane is the story of Karna, the unsung and undercelebrated hero from Mahabharata, from his wife Uruvi’s eyes. It is the story of Karna’s life unfurling as the princess of Pukeya, who is beautiful, brave and worthy in every way, falls for the Karna, becomes his queen and goes through this series of wrong-doings and setting-rights called Mahabharata. I am overall not a huge fan of the Indian Mythology as a genre. It’s probably a mental block, but the subject doesn’t engage me much due to several reasons. But, I will say that this book was a pleasant read despite all my personal limitations in the genre. We all grow up listening to granny’s tales on summer nights and watching reruns of tv series during summer vacations, so by the time we grow up, we have a garbled version of every story and sub-story in our minds. For example, we have always been told over and over again that Karna was a good guy, unfortunately fighting on the side of evil. I have never really been able to wrap my mind around this one. Now, as kids, we often accept this stuff as is, no questions asked. Which leaves us midway in clarity. Every plot/subplot/character in these epics have infinite layers to it and we usually don’t delve further than a few layers. So this is where books like Karna’s wife become a pleasant read if you don’t build your expectations up.

FR – Karna's Wife, The Outcast's Queen by Kavita Kane ! This book didn't carry any burden of my expectations on its shoulders. I am overall not a huge fan of the Indian Mythology as a genre. It's probably a mental block, but the subject doesn't engage me much due to several reasons. But, I will say that this book was a pleasant read despite all my personal limitations in the genre. We all grow up listening to granny's tales on summer nights and watching reruns of tv series during summer vacations, so by the time we grow up, we have a garbled version of every story and sub story in our minds. For example, we have always been told over and over again that Karna was a good guy, unfortunately fighting on the side of evil. I have never really been able to wrap my mind around this one. Now, as kids, we often accept this stuff as is, no questions asked. Which leaves us midway in clarity. Every plot/subplot/character in these epics have infinite layers to it and we usually don't delve further than a few layers. So this is where books like Karna's wife become a pleasant read if you don't build your expectations up. The book takes you through the epic with Uruvi's point of view, the princess who braves public shaming, ridicule and outrage to marry Karna, a charioteer's son, beneath her social status. Her attraction to Karna, brave and worthy, and yet ridiculed at every step, has been outlined well. Why Karna feels indebted and attached to Duryodhan is interesting too. It's enjoyable as long as I don't start looking for literary gems in the prose. Believe me when I say this, it's not the author's fault, it is the genre's. It has happened to me before when I read Amish Tripathi's Immortals of Meluha too. Adjectives start sounding repetitive, the prose looks similar everywhere and other than the plot, nothing really makes it engaging. Also, this jumbled mix of stories/dialogues/books from childhood in Hindi/Gujarati makes it difficult to enjoy this genre. So far, I haven't really found a book on Indian Mythology hasn't conflicted with the premise in my head and yet,whose prose captivates me! Pick it up as a light read with minimal expectations and it won't disappoint you.

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This book didn’t carry any burden of my expectations on its shoulders. The book takes you through the epic with Uruvi’s point of view, the princess who braves public shaming, ridicule and outrage to marry Karna, a charioteer’s son, beneath her social status. Her attraction to Karna, brave and worthy, and yet ridiculed at every step, has been outlined well. Why Karna feels indebted and attached to Duryodhan is interesting too. It’s enjoyable as long as I don’t start looking for literary gems in the prose. Believe me when I say this, it’s not the author’s fault, it is the genre’s. It has happened to me before when I read Amish Tripathi’s Immortals of Meluha too. Adjectives start sounding repetitive, the prose looks similar everywhere and other than the plot, nothing really makes it engaging. Also, this jumbled mix of stories/dialogues/books from childhood in Hindi/Gujarati makes it difficult to enjoy this genre. So far, I haven’t really found a book on Indian Mythology hasn’t conflicted with the premise in my head and yet whose prose captivates me! Pick it up as a light read with minimal expectations and it won’t disappoint you.

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